Black Coffee Dunkelweissen

Black Coffee Wheat

       
Type of Beer:

Dunkelweissen

 
Recipe Type:

Extract

 
Original Gravity:

1.05

 
Final Gravity:

1.009

 
Expected ABV:

5.25%

 
       

Ingredients:

8

lbs

Light Wheat Malt Extract

3

lbs

Light Malt Extract

0.25

lb

Chocolate Malt(Cracked)

0.25

lb

Black Patent

0.25

lb

Crystal 80 Malt (cracked)

0.25

lb

Roasted Barley

1

oz

Hallertaur or Northern Brewer (7.5 HBU)

0.5

oz

Hallertaur Hops (Aroma)

0.5

oz

Hallertaur Hops (Aroma)

1

Pkg

Bavarian Wyeast 3068

       

Directions:

1

Bring 5 Gallons of water to 150 degrees

2

Soak Grains for 30 minutes in 150 Degree water

3

Remove Grains, add extract, and Bring the Water to a Boil

4

once boiling, Add 1 oz Bittering Hops (Hallertaur or Northern Brewer) – Start 60 Minute Clock

5

30 Minute Mark:  Add .5 oz Hallertaur Aroma Hops

6

55 Minute Mark: Add Remaining Hallertaur Aroma Hops

7

Chill to 75 Degrees

8

Aerate into 5 gallong carboy and add yeast

9

After 7 days, transfer from Carboy to secondary Fermenter

10

After 7 more days, bottle

11

Bottling: Make a priming syrup, by boiling 1 cup of water and .75 cups of Corn sugar for 5 minutes.

12

Pour the priming syrup into an empty bottling bucket and siphon the beer from the fermenter into the bottling bucket.  Siphon the beer into sterilized bottles and cap.  Let the bottles sit for 2 weeks at 75 Degrees.

 

Belgian Wit Bier – Progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

In progress – this will be a recurring theme as we brew our new beers and test out the recipes that we have posted on here.  We’ll provide feedback as to how we thought the beers turned out.

Ok, so we have decided our next beer will be the Belgian Wit Bier recipe that we loaded up about a week ago or so.  This beer utilizes both normal brewing ingredients as well as some cooking spices and grocery ingredients.  We had some trouble getting the Orange Honey (Honey made by bees that are utilizing orange blossoms for the pollen, not necessarily orange flavored honey), so we decided to substitute with normal honey and increase the amount of Orange peel that the recipe calls for to make up some of the orange flavoring that should come through from the beer.  The other regular ingredients were pretty easy to come by, as they are normal spices found in most kitchens, being the coriander and the orange peel.

 

Ingredients:

Belgian wit beer (1)

 

 

Now, I have been told that a camping stove with a propane burner can be very useful for getting a full 5 gallon pot boiling very quickly.  We have not gone through the cost for one of those yet, and, as such, we are using the normal gas stove with 2-3 Gallons of water in a 5 gallon pot.  It tends to take around a full hour to get boiling, but the extra room in the pot does make boil overs easy to account for.  We are fans of getting a couple gallons of distilled water to help with measuring as well as cooling the wort down quickly.  Use one gallon as the start for the pot (pour it in, then use it like a huge measuring cup for the rest), and use the other gallon as a giant ice cube to cool the wort back down after boiling is done.  We stick the second gallon in the freezer about a day before we’re ready to brew so that it has time to freeze, then when the wort is just about done boiling, we pull the frozen gallon out, cut the plastic off and dunk the entire gallon into the wort to cool the boil down to 75 degrees so the yeast can grow.

I put together a fermenting fridge using some of the “suggested items” that I posted on the intial Tips/Instructions post.  This fridge has the ability to hold its temperature around 30-80 degrees by turning on and off the electricity to the fridge as needed.  Below is a photo of the belgian wit bier fermenting in the fridge.

Wort Fermenting:

Belgian wit beer (2)

 

Transfering the beer from the first stage of fermentation to the second stage via siphon:

Belgian wit beer (4)

a nice golden brown color for the belgian beer pouring into the secondary fermenting bucket.

Belgian wit beer (5)

 

I will post a couple Updates to this in the coming weeks as we move from secondary fermenting to bottling, then to tasting and enjoying our new beer.  

We’ll be seeing you soon!

Honey Porter

Honey Porter

Type of Beer: Porter
Recipe Type: Extract
Original Gravity:

1.075

Final Gravity:

1.015

Expected ABV:

7.88%

Ingredients:

6.6

Lb Light Malt Extract

0.75

Lb munich Malt (Cracked)

1

Lb Crystal 20 Malt (cracked)

6

oz black Malt (Cracked)

3

oz Chocolate Malt(Cracked)

1

lb Honey

10

HBU Bittering Hops (1 oz hops, can be scraps from other brews)

0.5

oz Hallertaur Hops (Aroma)

1

pkg Nottingham Dry Yeast

0.75

cups Corn Sugar for Bottling
Directions:

1

In a 1-2 gallon Stock Pot, bring 2.25 Quarts of water to 168 degrees and add Grains.  Mix well to reduce temperature to 155 degrees and steep for 45 Minutes.  At the same time, bring 2 gallons of water to 165 degrees in a 3 gallon (12 Quart) Stock Pot.  Place strainer over the larger pot and strain the tea into the 2 gallons of water.

2

Add the malt Extract and honey to the pot and stir well.

3

While boiling for an hour do the following steps

4

15 Minute Mark:  Add half of the bittering hops (10 HBU Hops)

5

30 Minute Mark:  Add the other half of the Bittering Hops (10 HBU Hops)

6

60 Minute Mark:  Add aroma hops

7

Let stand for 15 minutes

8

Place 2 gallons of chilled water into the primary fermenter and add the hot wort into it.  Top with more water to reach 5 gallons total of water.  Place the fermenter into an ice bath to cool down to 70-80 degrees.

9

Activate Dry yeast in 1 cup sterilized water at 75-90 Degrees for 15 minutes.  Pitch yeast in the fermenter, fill airlock halfway with water, and Ferment at room temperature (64-68 degrees) for 7 days.

10

Siphon the Wort to a secondary fermenter on day 7, and continue fermenting for another 7 days.

11

Bottling: Make a priming syrup, by boiling 1 cup of water and .75 cups of Corn sugar for 5 minutes.

12

Pour the priming syrup into an empty bottling bucket and siphon the beer from the fermenter into the bottling bucket.  Siphon the beer into sterilized bottles and cap.  Let the bottles sit for 2 weeks at 75 Degrees.

Belgian Wit Bier

Belgian Wit

       
Type of Beer:

Belgian Wit

 
Recipe Type:

Extract

 
Original Gravity:

1.05

 
Final Gravity:

 
Expected ABV:

 
       

Ingredients:

4.5

lb

Light Wheat Malt Extract

2

lb

Orange Honey

1

oz

Hallertaur or Northern Brewer (7.5 HBU)

1

oz

Hallertaur or Hersbrucker (3 HBU)

1.5

oz

Coriander (Crushed)

0.5

oz

Dried Orange Peel

1

pkg

Belgian Ale Yeast (Wyeast 1214)

0.75

cups

Corn Sugar for Bottling

       

Directions:

1

Bring 5 Gallons of water to Boil

2

Add Malt Extract, Honey and 7.5 HBU Hops

3

45 Minute Mark:  Add 3/4 oz Coriander

4

55 Minute Mark:  Add remaining Coriander and Orange Peel

5

60 Minute Mark:  Add 3 HBU Finishing Hops, boil for 2 Minutes

6

Chill to 75 Degrees

7

Aerate into 5 gallong carboy and add yeast

8

After 7 days, transfer from Carboy to secondary Fermenter

9

After 7 more days, bottle

10

Bottling: Make a priming syrup, by boiling 1 cup of water and .75 cups of Corn sugar for 5 minutes.

11

Pour the priming syrup into an empty bottling bucket and siphon the beer from the fermenter into the bottling bucket.  Siphon the beer into sterilized bottles and cap.  Let the bottles sit for 2 weeks at 75 Degrees.

Getting Started in Home Brewing

When you first start out home brewing, it can seem like there’s a lot of work involved.  Reading about it online or in books you hear about all the equipment that is needed and how important sanitation is to the process.  Don’t let the work and equipment overwhelm you.  Home brewing is a fun hobby that isn’t nearly as time consuming as the instructions make it seem.

Basic Equipment to get you started on Home Brewing:

  1.     Large Stock Pot that is at least 3 gallons and preferably 5+ gallons
  2.     6 gallon plastic bottling bucket with Lid
  3.     Around 3 Feet of .5″ plastic tubing for use when siphoning and bottling beer
  4.     Airlock
  5.     Rubber stopper for the Bottling Bucket
  6.     Bottle Capper           images

Below are optional Equipment that make brewing a bit easier and help to provide better results:

  1.     A Glass Carboy   1024px-CarboyHomebrew
  2.     A funnel to help in filling the Carboy
  3.     A Racking Cane auto-siphon-racking-cane-1_2-in-500x500
  4.     A Personal refrigerator that is at least 33″ High and 25″ Deep
  5.     A temperature controller to keep the refrigerator at your brewing temperature.
  6.     Star San food grade sanitizer

Directions:

The most important factor in brewing your own beer is sanitation.  If your beers go bad when attempting to brew, this is by far your number one culprit.  My first two beers didn’t go well because I didn’t take this seriously.  If you are a home cook like me you might think that if you keep your work surfaces clean and wash your utensils, then you are covered much as you are when cooking.  This is wrong, but don’t let me fool you, sanitation isn’t that hard when it comes to brewing.  If you have Star-San sanitizer, then sanitation is simple as the process is filling a bucket with 5 gallons of water as well as 1 oz of StarSan.  Once this solution has been created, you can simply soak everything in the bucket that may be used later on (Racking Cane, Stirring Spoons, Airlock, Stoppers, Funnels, and plastic Tubing).  If it is being boiled, then it doesn’t need to be sanitized as the boiling will take care of that.

Basic Steps of a recipe:

Not all recipes are the same, and they won’t all follow the same steps, but most of the extract recipes I’ve used and looked at seem to follow this same process.  Note:  I haven’t been brave enough to attempt an all grain recipe at this time.

  1.   Put 3-5 gallons of water on the stove and bring to a boil
  2. While the water is heating, put in the grains (If used) and steep for ~45 minutes
  3. Remove grains and bring water to a boil
  4. Boil the water for 60 minutes
  5. During this boiling time, add the hops at different intervals during boil
  6. After 60 minutes, turn off the heat on your pot and bring the water down to 75-90 degrees as quickly as possible
  7. Combine the Boiled water with enough sanitary cold water to make 5 gallons in your fermenting container (Carboy or plastic Bucket)
  8. activate the dry yeast by hydrating the yeast in 1 cup of sanitary water that is 75-90 degrees for 15 minutes.
  9. Pour the yeast into the bucket with the wort and pitch the yeast (“Rock the Baby”) by tipping the bucket back and forth to get air incorporated with the yeast.
  10. Cap the bucket with the top as well as the airlock filled halfway with water
  11. Store the fermenting beer in a location that is between 64 and 70 degrees (colder within this range the better)
  12. Wait 3-7 days, then transfer the beer to a secondary fermentation bucket using the racking cane (This helps reduce the amount of sediment in the beer), cap and airlock
  13. wait 7 more days, then bottle the beer
  14. Bottling:
  •  Boil 1 cup of water with 3/4 Cup Corn Sugar on the stove
  •  Pour the sugar mixture into a bottling bucket, then siphon the beer from the secondary fermenter into the bottling bucket
  • using the plastic tubing, fill as many bottles as you can with the beer, cap and let sit at room temperature for 2 weeks

15.   a Few days before drinking, place the bottles in a cold refrigerator to get them down to temperature.

16.   Open and Enjoy your beer!